This Little Clock Measures the Massive Wage Gap between Men and Women

by | Sep 13, 2016 | #innovations, #social, blog | 0 comments

 

Did you know that the average working woman in America is paid only 79% of her male co-worker’s salary? But it’s not only in the United States that men receive higher salaries than women. In South Africa, the estimated gender pay gap is between 15% and 17% meaning that the average woman would need to work an additional two months a year in order to earn the annual salary of her male counterpart. According to data attained from the International Labour Organisation, the global wage gap ranges from 4% to 36% or more.

As part of its anti-bias Look Different campaign, MTV wanted to highlight the way in which gender affects pay. To do this, it teamed up with PARTY NY and created the inventive 79% Work Clock. The clock, which sounds an alarm 79% of the way through the work day, aims to remind employers and employees that women aren’t being paid for what they are doing after a certain time of day.

Head of Public Affairs for MTV, Ronnie Cho, says: “The gender pay gap is a little understood issue among Millennials based on our research and we wanted to shed light on the issue by creating a physical clock to provoke conversation.”

 

 

Although the clock isn’t for sale just yet, MTV did distribute it to an array of powerful individuals – including a few presidential candidates – and reported that the idea received an overwhelming amount of support.

Creative and Tech Director of PARTY NY, Jaimie Carreiro, explained that measuring the wage gap on a daily basis was their way of making this issue more present in people’s minds.

While the 79% Work Clock does make an important statement about gender inequality, it’s also important to bear in mind that the pay gap is far wider for women of colour. We’d like to see Look Different and PARTY NY factor in this divide in future renditions of the clock though we’re still willing to give this project the thumbs up – for now.

Visit www.79percentclock.com to learn more. Or use the calculator to determine what time your working day should end, according to your pay.